DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
Save 50% off on 26 weeks of The New York Times Digital
 
2014
May
31
 
 
IBM is AMC’s new villain in residence, having loomed forebodingly over this spring’s Mad Men episodes and now looking even more sinister in the network's new Halt and Catch Fire...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
28
 
 
Mad Men shut down until next spring with the eventful Sunday, May 25th episode, subtitled “Waterloo.” Here are 10 takeaways...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
26
 
 
Her character looked pretty dead near the end of Tuesday’s very eventful and suitably bizarre Fargo episode, subtitled “Buridan’s Ass.” But although she can’t say quite how yet, Allison Tolman assures fans of the series that deputy Molly Solverson will remain vertical...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
21
 
 
Premiering on Thursday, May 22 – the day after the end of the so-called “regular season” – Fox’s bloody Gang Related is no summertime breeze. But it does seem to find its legs during the course of the first four episodes...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
19
 
 
Presenting 10 takeaways from Sunday's Mad Men’s episode, “The Strategy.” Or maybe this time they should be called “takeouts,” in deference to a Mad Men episode that took its cue from a campaign to woo Burger Chef as a client...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
18
 
 
No tears were shed -- at least not by the honoree herself -- during the making of Barbara Walters’ goodbye as a co-host of The View...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 
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