DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
 
2014
May
24
 
 
Don Rickles is getting his own grilling in a special tribute on Spike TV’s One Night Only on May 28. Here, in a 1968 Kraft Music Hall Friars Club broadcast, "The Merchant of Venom" is roasting Johnny Carson...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
15
 
 
Fans of FX’s Louie  might have noticed that creator Louis C.K. has dropped the show's theme "Brother Louie," done by the band Stories in 1973...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
11
 
 
The May 4 episode of AMC’s Mad Men ended with closing credits showcasing a very catchy and appropriate song: “On a Carousel,” released by The Hollies in 1967.... as Mad Men is in its final season, poor Don has gone round and round to where he’s just hanging on, longing for things just out of reach – just as in the song...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2014
May
1
 
 
NPR's pop culture blog, Monkey See, is running this 13-minute Craig Ferguson "Best Of" tribute now that the late night talk show host has announced he's stepping down from Late Late Show in December. There are many highlights here...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post