DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

CANDACE KELLEY

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
vudu.com
 
2017
Jan
21
 
 
As Idina Menzel premieres this weekend in the Lifetime remake of the 1988 Bette Midler/Barbara Hershey film, Beaches, we're thinking her most remembered moment wasn’t her run as the original Elphaba in Wicked on Broadway. Or, as part of the Glee cast, or even with her voicing of Queen Elsa in Frozen, singing the smash hit “Let it Go"...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
16
 
 
Here’s President Harry S. Truman’s address, January 20, 1949, from the first presidential inauguration to be televised. Truman, although having run as an incumbent after the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt, trailed his opponent in many polls of the day, similar to the data stream of 2016...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
4
 
 
What to say about The OA, since any discussion of it would result in major spoilers in the streaming universe, which like the metaphysical space the series inhabits, is unmoored in time and reference?...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
2
 
 
After last year’s wild ride, we’re kicking off 2017 with a five-minute meditation; a bit of reality programming from a middle-of-the-night chauffeured view from the dashboard cam of driver Noah Forman — who made 236 green lights (and one yellow) in New York City in 26 minutes...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is now avaialble on Amazon.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post