DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

GERALD JORDAN

CANDACE KELLEY

TOM BRINKMOELLER

MONIQUE NAZARETH

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
SecondSpin.com
 
 
 
 
2017
Feb
8
 
 
David has recapped The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour 50th anniversary for the New York Times this week, and in his TVWW blog. Looking back, it’s no surprise the young brothers got their own show on CBS in 1967. Their timing, charm and wit were quite something... The brothers returned to CBS in 1988 for a memorable reunion special...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
6
 
 
Granted, this may not be for all TVWW readers, but greetings from Boston, home of one of your TVWW editors and a million or so bleary-eyed survivors of last night’s historic Super Bowl LI overtime finish...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
4
 
 

Back in the day, the first Super Bowl wasn’t even the name for the game. It was known in 1967 as the AFL-NFL World Championship Game...  but the instinct for spectacle was there from the start...


 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
29
 
 
Cue the Twilight Zone theme as we submit this clip from the 1958 CBS western Trackdown, featuring a character named Trump promising the townsfolk special protection from a wall he alone knows how to build...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
21
 
 
As Idina Menzel premieres this weekend in the Lifetime remake of the 1988 Bette Midler/Barbara Hershey film, Beaches, we're thinking her most remembered moment wasn’t her run as the original Elphaba in Wicked on Broadway. Or, as part of the Glee cast, or even with her voicing of Queen Elsa in Frozen, singing the smash hit “Let it Go"...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
16
 
 
Here’s President Harry S. Truman’s address, January 20, 1949, from the first presidential inauguration to be televised. Truman, although having run as an incumbent after the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt, trailed his opponent in many polls of the day, similar to the data stream of 2016...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
4
 
 
What to say about The OA, since any discussion of it would result in major spoilers in the streaming universe, which like the metaphysical space the series inhabits, is unmoored in time and reference?...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
2
 
 
After last year’s wild ride, we’re kicking off 2017 with a five-minute meditation; a bit of reality programming from a middle-of-the-night chauffeured view from the dashboard cam of driver Noah Forman — who made 236 green lights (and one yellow) in New York City in 26 minutes...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
17
 
 
Small dramas usually mean even smaller audiences, but Rectify, the little show that could, proved that there remains a market for stories where nothing explodes, a psychopath isn’t waiting around the next corner and life moves at a pace that is credible — it mirrored our own...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
5
 
 
Among the many interviews David conducted for his look at the evolution of TV’s Platinum Age, he talked with another David, Larry, about the genre of “Splitcoms” — situation comedies like Seinfeld that are set half in the lead character’s home... But before all that, he was cast in the 1980-82 ABC late-night comedy series Fridays. One recurring bit, a character named Solly Mullins, was a temp worker who showed up to all sorts of preposterous gigs, like standing in for John Lennon who does not show up for a world-wide Beatles reunion...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Eric Gould

Associate Editor

Eric Gould is a writer in Boston. With prior stints in art, music, photography and design under his belt, he casts a wide net across the media pool fishing for the smart, the surprising and the oddly compelling. He is also the DVD review editor for TVWW. Email him at gould@tvworthwatching.com

 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for under $20.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 
 

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