DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
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2007
Nov
13
 
 
You know that feeling, in the middle of May, when you're watching the last few first-run installments of your favorite shows - and feel a little sad because you know you're going to have to wait four months to see them again? Just into the second week of the strike, I feel the same way. Actually, I feel worse...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
12
 
 
Today, on its own website called www.quarterlife.com, a new TV series, also called "Quarterlife," is scheduled to be unveiled. Actually, it was unveiled yesterday as a sneak preview on MySpace -- where, as I watched on my laptop that afternoon, a MySpace counter announced that "Quarterlifehas 856 friends..."
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
11
 
 
The Aaron in the title doesn't refer to baseball legend Hank Aaron - but to stage, screen and TV writer Aaron Sorkin. His "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip" series folded after its freshman season, but on other fronts, the prolific and gifted writer seemed set, with a new Broadway play opening this Wednesday...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
10
 
 
The writers' strike is going to make it trickier to find six outstanding TV recommendations each night, especially as the networks begin stockpiling scripted series like nuts for the winter. (If the producers don't settle the strike soon, they're the nuts - but I digress.) Except for "Saturday Night Live" being relegated to reruns, though, tonight's TV lineup pretty much is the same as it would have been pre-strike...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
9
 
 
The new Broadway play by Aaron Sorkin, "The Farnsworth Invention," opens next week. When it does open, I'll be reviewing it for NPR's Fresh Air, because it's got TV written all over it, and couldn't be more in my wheelhouse...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
8
 
 
The last time there was a writers' strike in Hollywood - meaning show biz rather than geography, since it hits New York as well - it was in 1988, it lasted just over 22 weeks, and it was writers vs. producers, while the networks sat by as concerned bystanders. The net result was that about 10 percent of the broadcast TV networks' audience defected to cable and never looked back...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
7
 
 
This is the third day of TV WORTH WATCHING. After all those decades of being a TV critic, I can't help but think of the launch of the website in terms of the launch of a new TV series. You plan for months to craft a "pilot," then have to turn right around and churn out additional episodes - all while having no idea whether your project will attract enough viewers to survive...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
6
 
 
I worked so hard, along with website co-conspirators Chris Spurgeon and Eric Gould, to launch this website on schedule - the day my farewell column would run in the New York Daily News - that I never thought about how I would feel when the day finally arrived...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2007
Nov
5
 
 
Welcome to the official launch of TV WORTH WATCHING, a website devoted to the discovery, discussion and dissemination of quality television. The fact that it comes into existence at midnight on November 5 - the very moment the writers in Hollywood threatened to strike - is pure, goofy coincidence. TV, it is the firm position of this website, is better when it's written...
 
 
 
  
 
 
1990
Sep
21
 
 
I'm proud of this because, without any inkling of how popular, influential or resonant this documentary series would become - and without knowing that Ken Burns was about to become a household word - this review nailed what was best about The Civil War. Namely, historian Shelby Foote, filmmaker Burns' graceful visual approach, the poetry of the storytelling, and one soldier's unforgettable letter home in particular.
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

David Bianculli

Founder / Editor

David Bianculli has been a TV critic since 1975, including a 14-year stint at the New York Daily News, and sees no reason to stop now. Currently, he's TV critic for NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross, and is an occasional substitute host for that show. He's also an author and teaches TV and film history at New Jersey's Rowan University. His 2009 Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour', has been purchased for film rights and his latest, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to the Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific, is now available at Amazon. The paperback version will be released fall, 2017.

 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 
 

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