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1966: 'Star Trek' Launches on NBC
September 8, 2017  | By TV WW
 
This day in 1966 marked the debut of Star Trek — later known as Star Trek: The Original Series to differentiate the show from its many TV and film spinoffs — on NBC. 

The science fiction series, created by Gene Roddenberry and set in the 23rd century, followed the crew of the USS Enterprise on a mission to "explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before." The cast included William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk, Leonard Nimoy as first officer Spock, DeForest Kelley as medical officer Dr. Leonard 'Bones' McCoy. Additional cast members included James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, Walter Koenig, Grace Lee Whitney and Majel Barrett. 

Star Trek's first season ratings weren't spectacular, but the show's desirable demographic (and a second-season letter-writing campaign secretly organized by Roddenberry) kept the show going for three seasons. The show was cancelled in June 1969.

Ironically, it was a unique syndication deal that allowed first season episodes to run during the show's third season that helped fuel the show's popularity. By 1972 the show was prospering, with legions of fans worldwide.
 
 
 
 
 
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Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is now available in paperback for under $15. Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. Interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer are high points... Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

This Day in TV History