2017
Apr
20
 
 
On this day in 1997, HBO debuted the telefilm In the Gloaming...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
19
 
 
On this day in 1990, NBC launched the sitcom, Wings...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
18
 
 
This day in 1966 marked the 38th Annual Academy Awards, the first Oscar awards ceremony to be broadcast in color...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
17
 
 
This day in 1989 marked the launch of the Consumer News and Business Channel, better known as CNBC...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
16
 
 
On this day in 1978, NBC presented the first part of its four-day miniseries, Holocaust...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
15
 
 
In Living Color debuted on this day in 1990...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
14
 
 
On this day in 1985, CBS presented the 13-hour miniseries, Space, based on the same-name 1982 novel by James A. Michener...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
13
 
 
On this day in 1978, NBC debuted The Hanna-Barbera Happy Hour, a variety series hosted by life-size puppets, Honey and Sis...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
12
 
 
On this day in 1987, Fox debuted its hit series, 21 Jump Street...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Apr
11
 
 
On this day in 1994, CBS presented the final All in the Family spinoff, 704 Hauser...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post