SecondSpin.com
 
2017
Feb
11
 
 
On this day in 1990, NBC launched Blind Faith, a two-part miniseries based on the eponymous true-crime book by author Joe McGinniss...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
10
 
 
On this day in 1993, "King of Pop" Michael Jackson sat down for a live interview with Oprah Winfrey — his first interview in 14 years...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
9
 
 
On this day in 1964, The Ed Sullivan Show became the most-watched TV show of its era, thanks to an appearance by the Beatles...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
8
 
 
On this day in 1979, NBC attempted to turn the two-part movie Little Women into a weekly series...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
7
 
 
On this day in 2000, Mary Tyler Moore and Valerie Harper reprised their roles from the '70s sitcom, The Mary Tyler Moore Show...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
6
 
 
The Winds of War — which debuted on this day in 1983 — ranks in the Nielsen ratings as the third-highest miniseries in TV history...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
5
 
 
On this day in 1967, CBS introduced The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
4
 
 
On this day in 1996, NBC debut the first part of the two-part miniseries, Gulliver's Travels...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
3
 
 
On this day in 1971 George C. Scott gave an Emmy-winning performance in Hallmark Hall of Fame: The Price...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
2
 
 
On this day in 2003, ABC introduced producer Dick Wolf's remake of the classic cop series, Dragnet...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for under $20.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

This Day in TV History