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2017
Jul
20
 
 
This day in 1950 marked the start of the Golden Age of Television's answer to Dancing with the Stars: Arthur Murray Party Time — which was later renamed The Arthur Murray Party...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
19
 
 
This day in 1991 marked the debut of the sitcom Hi Honey, I'm Home!...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
18
 
 
This day marked the premiere of the Fox sitcom, Karen's Song, starring Patty Duke...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
17
 
 
On this day in 1983, the NBC police drama aired its last original episode...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
16
 
 
On this day in 2004, Stargate Atlantis made its debut on the Sci-Fi (now Syfy) Channel...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
15
 
 
On this day in 1968, ABC debuted the long-running soap opera, One Life to Live...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
14
 
 
On this day in 1990, mega-popular radio shock jock (and current, for now, America's Got Talent judge) Howard Stern introduced his Saturday night show The Howard Stern Show on WWOR-TV...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
13
 
 
On this day in 1985, the benefit concert Live Aid was staged simultaneously in London and Philadelphia...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
12
 
 
This day in 2002 marked the debut of the detective series, Monk...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jul
11
 
 
This day in 2011 marked the final telecast of Law & Order: LA...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

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