SATURDAY
NOVEMBER 24
2012

BIANCULLI’S BEST BETS

 

HBO, 7:45 p.m. ET

This film, a pet project of George Lucas’, finally came to the screen in 2012, directed by Anthony Hemingway, who also has directed some recent episodes of HBO’s Treme. It’s a dramatization of the WWII aerial combat unit known now as the Tuskegee airmen, a group of African-Americans who belatedly, but bravely, were sent into combat in 1944. Stars include Nate Parker, Terrence Howard, Bryan Cranston and Cuba Gooding, Jr.
 
  
 
 

CBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

This new CBS series from the fall 2012 crop was cut down so instantly and emphatically, only two episodes were televised before CBS pulled it from the schedule: the pilot, and one other. But this is Thanksgiving weekend, when network TV presumes no one is watching or caring very much about what’s on the tube (all that family around and such), so why not broadcast a never-before-seen third episode of Made in Jersey, starring Janet Montgomery as Jersey girl attorney Martina? And, in the same spirit of post-turkey ennui, or saluting a different sort of turkey altogether, why not highlight it?
 
  
 
 

Encore, 8:00 p.m. ET

This 2003 movie, the culminating installment in Peter Jackson’s directorial exploration of the J.R.R. Tolkien trilogy, won Best Picture and an additional 10 Oscars – and the story isn’t over yet. Or, rather, it’s only just begun: Movies based on its prequel, The Hobbit, are just around the corner. And, no doubt, they’ll prove to be no less Hobbit-forming.
 
  
 
 

TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

Even in black and white, you can tell, in this 1938 Oscar-winning role for Bette Davis, that the party dress she’s wearing in antebellum New Orleans is scandalously red. Okay, so the plot and dialogue help – but still.
 
  
 
 

TCM, 10:00 p.m. ET

There’s a lot more to this 1959 biblical epic than its famous chariot race – but oh my, there’s a reason why that chariot race, in this version, is so famous, and so iconic. And if you have a wide-screen, high-definition TV, you can see why, in a big way. A big way, and a wide way, too – the image you see here is only half the picture.
 
  
 
 
 
 
Read and add comments HERE for today's Best Bets!
 
 
 
 
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512 Comments
 
 
Sarah
For my final thoughts on The Colbert Report---Sarah Watches For You!: The Colbert Report 2005-2014 http://sarahwatches4u.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-colbert-report-2005-2014.html?spref=tw
Dec 18, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Mac
Well,the first Colbert Report in the marathon was last night's show,so maybe they are going in reverse order.Can't stay with this,but it might lead up to the first episode to spool at 10:30PM.
Dec 18, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Dan Malloy
It is Wednesday 9:09 am and I'm locked into Tuesday's Best bets.
FLIP THE SWITCH EARLIER!!!!!
Dec 17, 2014   |  Reply
 
David Bianculli
Dear Dan: Please find attached a refund for the remaining portion of your paid subscription. Oh, wait... Well, happy holidays regardless.
Dec 17, 2014
 
 
 
Dave
Your observation re: The Voice that "not one judge selected a female to advance to the final rounds" is puzzling. I believe audience votes (and iTunes downloads) determine which singers advance in the live rounds, not the judges.
Dec 15, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
George
Oprah as one of the most fascinating people of 2014? Why? Oh, that's right, I forgot -- she's on the list every year, because she insists!
Dec 14, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Mac
So,even at an hour, Rudolph gets the modern day chopped & sped routine to fit in the one hour timeslot.I thought for years that the original fitted into a 90 minute slot,since it came on at 5:30PM on its 1964 premiere.Evidently,though,it only pre-empted the G.E.College Bowl & Meet the Press,two half hour shows.And one wonders if the GE small appliance ads,featuring the elves,will ever see the light...that's how I'd celebrate Rudy's 50th.Evidently,even the new Blu-Ray package is just a shiny cover and no attempts to restore Rudy properly since the last do-over in 2008.
Meanwhile,A Charlie Brown Christmas will have a Peanuts movie in theaters when it turns 50 next year and the trailer alludes to the original Christmas special with Snoopy's doghouse lighting contest now involving Woodstock & Co.(pretty good,too).
Dec 9, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
lovely as mention by View from http://www.unathievents.co.za
Dec 7, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Poly Cobb
On your Fresh Air discussion of the live version of "Peter Pan," you said that the craze for the play began with the Mary Martin production. The production I remember and thought so much better was the 1950 production with Jean Arthur as Peter and Boris Karloff as Capt. Hook. Leonard Bernstein wrote a full score, but in the end only five of the songs, plus incidental music, were used. Jean Arthur was so perfectly boy-ish and Karloff showed a wonderful comedic/evil gift in portraying Hook. He also did Mr. Darling. There is a recording of that production which includes much spoken material and all of the songs, and it is a delight--at least to those of us who were enchanted by it as children. I hope you discover it for yurself sometime.
Dec 4, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Mac
You recommend the chopped-for- more commercials version of Charlie Brown Christmas without mentioning the new Toy Story special that proceeded it?It's been a long time since I spooled through an ABC version of Charlie Brown and was left dizzy and disappointed.Meanwhile,even with all of the Disne/ABC fire power and Wal-Mart(exclusives on the figures)couldn't diminish the power of a kid's imagination.Hope the kids scorned the ads between the story and got back to playing with last year's toys while waiting for a new haul in a few weeks.
Dec 2, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Mary Ann Rund
Mr. Bianculli, Thank you so much for mentioning the cultural shift of sharing television programming vs. individual selection. I doubt many people consider how this has contributed to our current culture. In my Dance As Art Form course, we discuss the importance of shared experience, particularly in dance and theatre. In the past, whatever townspeople created or, if they were so lucky, the production of a touring company, was what people were exposed to and influenced by. Later on, movie houses, television, and now, the ubiquitous online device. All of this change within a century. Yes, we can reach anyone across the world, "like" a site alongside a foe, watch what our friend recommends, but we cannot sit alongside other people of our community to enjoy a work of performance art. I hope that you are right about Peter Pan television broadcast, a kinda-sorta compromise. Thank you for your insights; I hear regularly on Fresh Air, one of my favorite radio programs, still shared.
Dec 2, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Phillip R. Crabb
Well Dave, that time of year again.

Let's hope they put the best of the Christmas classics in some proximity to Christmas.

I see Rudolph is 50 years old. Geesh! I remember when that was new, and the commercials were some of the characters riding on top of Ronson Electric Razors down a hill of snow.

Charlie Brown, the best of them all, with Dolly Madison and Coke commercials.

Would it be asking too much to bring Red Skelton with Freddie the Freeloader Christmas Skit on Christmas Eve?

Best of the Holidays, Dave. Looking forward to your reflections on those classic days.

Phil
Franklin (Sussex County) NJ
Nov 28, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Keith
I'm really enjoying "The Flash" but I am starting to wonder how long its "freak of the week" focus can last. The "freak of the week" nature of "Smallville's" first season was often cited in reviews as a negative. "Smallville" eventually got rid of the "freak of the week" which, I think, strengthened the series for a while before it started going downhill and jumping the shark for other reasons. I'm just hoping that "The Flash" doesn't get too bogged down in limiting the show to villains (or heroes) affected by the particle accelerator disaster. I think "Smallville" learned not to focus each episode on "meteor freaks." Here's hoping that the producers of "The Flash" learn from "Smallville's" mistakes.
Nov 26, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Jan
I was lucky as a child--before DVDs--that both The Wizard of Oz and Gone With The Wind were both re-released to theaters, where I saw both of them. When The Wizard if Oz went from black and white to color, it was magical. Only years later, when I saw it as an adult, did I realize how clever the lyrics were. And Gone With The Wind was shown complete with intermission. I'll never forget either one, and I am eternally grateful for my father who loved movies so much that we went almost every weekend. (For some reason, he never let us see The Bowery Boys :-( but I used to see them on a Chicago TV station every Saturday morning and grew to love them. Still do.)
Nov 24, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Lynn
It's not Thanksgiving yet but I am so thankful for the TVWW emails I receive. After reading about the exhibit I now realize all that has been going on and why the TVWW email's timing has been off on some days. But here's the thing-- I see so many of the 'busy' people around me simplify and very much alter the quality of the products they produce. Personally I would rather most products come later but with the depth and quality I count on. A holiday example, I would always rather receive a thoughtful Christmas letter a month after Christmas than a hurriedly signed card weeks before. I watch TV to enrich my life, so I want to watch quality shows and I don't have or want to make the time to check them out myself. So to get reviews I can trust from TVWW, that are pretty much on time, that is absolutely worth receiving a few late ones for me.
Nov 24, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Neil
You wrote today, "Why in the hell hasn’t [The Kennedy Center Mark Twain Prize] award been bestowed upon the Smothers Brothers..." Simple answer: demos. Everyone wants the 18-49 audience, including PBS. Leno is relatively current, and he appeals to people in that demo who watched the Tonight Show over the last few decades. To have watched and appreciated the Smothers Bros. Comedy Hour in their last year on air, you needed to have been at least 9 years old in 1969, which puts their audience at age 54 or older today. That's past the demos the TV industry wants to reach, so hence, no Smothers. The Prize Committee's choices have to be influenced by that thinking.
Nov 23, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Neil
You wrote today, "Why in the hell hasn’t [The Kennedy Center Mark Twain Prize] award been bestowed upon the Smothers Brothers..." Simple answer: demos. Everyone wants the 18-49 audience, including PBS. Leno is relatively current, and he appeals to people in that demo who watched the Tonight Show over the last few decades. To have watched and appreciated the Smothers Bros. Comedy Hour in their last year on air, you needed to have been at least 9 years old in 1969, which puts their audience at age 54 or older today. That's past the demos the TV industry wants to reach, so hence, no Smothers. The Prize Committee's choices have to be influenced by that thinking.
Nov 23, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Mike Pavlov
Jay Leno was a great comic that was, in my opinion (IMO) ruined by the
Tonight Show. I also love the contrary, somewhat snarky Dave Bianculli. Much better than an "agree to disagree" comment.
Nov 23, 2014   |  Reply
 
 
Fred Montgomery
Your picks for Saturday are, like, so stale. An old SNL with Drew Barrymore? Really? How about something new like "The Missing," a new series beginning tonight on Starz? Cmon, let's look forward, not backward :).
Nov 15, 2014   |  Reply
 
Angela
I would like to apologize for my last comment as it wasn't fair or nice. Often I see recommendations for shows here in the comments section. (I've also read that it's not always easy to choose only 5 shows for the Best Bets.)
I usually read the comments partly for that reason as I've found out about some great shows I might have otherwise missed.
All the writers on TVWW do great things here and it's made even more special because they only do it out of their passion for TV (and not money) and wanting to share that love with everyone. How can we criticize that?
Nov 18, 2014
 
 
Angela
I have an idea! Why don't you start your own website with what you consider to be the best bets for TV worth watching instead of criticizing others who do more than complain? :)
(did my smily face take the sting out of what I said?)
Nov 18, 2014
 
 
Curtis
As the last person, most likely, in the country that doesn't have cable or satellite tv I appreciate Dave's picks that come up on broadcast channels. Considering that NBC has 40 years of SNLs to choose from the chances are very good that an old rerun will be pretty good so that's a gimme. New SNLs - not so much. I still appreciate the heads up. Conversely, we just got n•tfl•x. Now we're never going to get anything done.
Nov 15, 2014
 
 
 
Alan
Your picks of the day come along so late in the day that I generally click on your web cite just to see what I missed from the previous day. Really, can't you get your picks on pre-noon?
Nov 12, 2014   |  Reply
 
Bob
Really? Alan, how much do you pay for this website that you can request a time of delivery?
Nov 13, 2014
 
 
 
Bob
Updated before 8AM? What am I going to complain about all day?
Nov 10, 2014   |  Reply
 
Angela
Thanks for the smile on my face.
Nov 18, 2014
 
 
 
 
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David Bianculli

Founder / Editor

Behind David in the picture is the first TV owned by his father, Virgil Bianculli, a 1946 Raytheon. (The TV, not his father. His father was a 1923 Italian.) David Bianculli has been a TV critic since 1975, including a 14-year stint at the New York Daily News, and sees no reason to stop now. Currently, he's TV critic for NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross, and is an occasional substitute host for that show. He also teaches TV and film history at New Jersey's Rowan University, and his most recent book, 2009's Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, has recently been purchased for film rights.  He's currently at work on another.