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NBC EXECUTIVE GRANT TINKER
August 8, 1985  | By David Bianculli
 

(Philadelphia Inquirer - Aug. 2, 1985)

In more than 30 years of covering the TV industry, I've known maybe a handful of TV executives who have left the medium better than they found it, and actively sought programs and talent that were exceptional as well as popular - and also, as a bonus, are nice human beings. Brandon Stoddard, who ran the movies and miniseries division during ABC's glory years, was one. Brandon Tartikoff, a natural TV programmer who helped nurture NBC's 1980s reputation for quality, was another. As executive show runners, Lindsay Law (then of PBS's American Playhouse), Bruce Paltrow (The White Shadow, St. Elsewhere), and Peter Lassally (associated with Johnny Carson, David Letterman and, currently, Craig Ferguson of The Late Late Show) are others. Grant Tinker spent time on both sides of the fence - running MTM Productions when it was the best production company in the business, then running NBC and making it similarly enviable. If tasteful creative people like Grant Tinker still ran the broadcast networks, we'd have a lot fewer shows like The Biggest Loser and Cavemen.


Bianculli - Philadelphia Enquirer 080285.pdf
 
 
 
 
 
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Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is now avaialble on Amazon.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

This Day in TV History

 
 
 
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