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Chelsea Handler Does Politics at the University of Florida to Promote Season 2 of Chelsea
April 28, 2017  | By Karle Dunbar  | 1 comment
 

When the second season of Chelsea Handler's Netflix talk show, Chelsea, premiered Friday, April 14, a few changes arrived with it.

The 30-minute (give or take), three-times-a-week program has now become a once-a-week, hour-long show. This isn't to say that Handler won't be her usual sarcastic and witty self with a little John Oliver spice tossed in for good measure.  The change gives the host more time to delve into topics and the ability to discuss more serious subject matters.

The usual Chelsea Handler approach to chatting with celebrities is still safe – sophomoric, inane, and a clear lack of boundaries – as well as her blunt honesty. But she's added a new layer to the proceedings.

In an effort to kick off her show's new focus, as well as her dedicated efforts to get more involved in the political process, Handler went to the University of Florida the night before her Season 2 premiere. 

Over 2,500 students and faculty flooded the Philips Center for the Performing Arts at the University to see Chelsea take a more serious tone. While at UF, Handler was joined during her political discussion by MSNBC correspondent Jacob Soboroff, a frequent guest on her show.

It was Handler's first college talk where she discussed politics and the importance of young voter turnout.

"After this past election, I just felt that there was so much that I didn't know about certain parts of this country, I felt responsible, uninformed and really lame about what happened," said Handler as she started her speech. "I just really want to understand different points of view and want to get out of the bubble that I live in because we need to talk about everything that we have in common instead of everything that separates us."

Handler discussed how her show is going to be different this season. She wants it to be more about her learning about various subjects and taking the viewers on the journey with her. According to Handler, there are so many things in this world she didn't really care about before but is interested in learning about now. She wants experts to "make her care" about those particular issues and topics.

"I know that I am a privileged, white woman, but it's not about my needs or your needs," said Handler. "It is about people you know or people you don't even know; it's about their needs."

All of which explains why Handler is so steadfast about making this season of Chelsea something different than we have ever seen from her.

Handler and Soboroff even called Van Jones, CNN Political Commentator and former advisor to President Obama, on FaceTime for a few minutes to get his point of view on young voter turnout.

"We have seen one of the most impressive resistance movements in the history of the world after this past election," said Jones. "Mobilization at the town hall level has been insanely effective."

Jones, who was a guest on Handler's first episode of Season 2, discussed everything from Syria to Jared Kushner's flak vest/suit jacket combo.

After an hour of back and forth conversation in the Performing Arts Center, Handler opened up the discussion to the audience and gave them a chance to speak, as well.

A UF student asked Handler, "In this current political state, how do you remain so optimistic?"

Handler simply replied, "I want to be someone who makes a difference. There is no point in being hopeless; that gets you nowhere. Be optimistic, and if you can't, just fake it until you make it."

And if the first few Season 2 episodes of Chelsea are any indication, through all the bluster and her bad girl image, Chelsea intends to effect change and bring her audience along with her.

NOTE: This is the debut column of TV Worth Watching's Social Media Manager, Karle Dunbar. Karle is a student at the University of Florida, a TV and film addict (of course), and a relatively new member of the TVWW team. We're sure that, like us, you'll be interested in hearing more from her.

 
 
 
 
 
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DeeAnn Bostain
GREAT JOB Karle !!! :) BRAVO
Apr 28, 2017   |  Reply
 
 
 
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Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

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