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No Love for 'Love' as Emmy Noms Announced
July 16, 2017  | By Bill Brioux
 

What?! No love for Love? That was my first reaction upon hearing the list of nominations for the 69th Annual Emmy Awards.

Actually, I would have been surprised to see the Judd Apatow-produced Netflix gem (Gillian Jacobs and Paul Rust, top) among the shows listed in the Best Comedy category. It is such a crammed list already, with Atlanta, Black-ish, Master of None, Modern Family, Silicon Valley, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Veep all in the hunt. No room for the final season of HBO’s Girls, either, which was no surprise to me.

Grace & Frankie is not a great show, and didn’t get nominated, but the two reasons to watch it both got nominated: Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin.

Not sure if Modern Family still deserves to be in the mix because I stopped watching when the kids all started shaving. No snub Transparent didn’t make the drama or comedy cut (although good to see Kathryn Hahn get some recognition). The Amazon series seemed to meander away it’s third season.

The big news was the 90+ nominations for Netflix, including three Best Drama nods for the streaming service — The Crown, House of Cards and Stranger Things. Nice to see a shot-in-Toronto Hulu show such as Handmaid’s Tale break through. Kudos, too, to Quebecer Jean-Marc Vallée for scoring a Best Director nomination in the Limited Series category. His two leads on HBO’s Big Little Lies, Reese Witherspoon and Nichole Kidman (right, both nominated) were such fans of his work they insisted he direct every episode.

Saturday Night Live‘s 22 nominations seems about right given the giant jump in ratings as well as media interest in the series, goosed by great performances from Alec Baldwin, Melissa McCarthy and Kate McKinnon. HBO’s Westworld also scored 22 noms, and deserves them for style and art direction, as well as special effects. Story? Not so much.

Interesting how Jimmy Fallon dropped out of the Best Late Night running this year, while Stephen Colbert and other less frivolous, more politically engaged late night hosts soared ahead. Samantha Bee, John Oliver and Bill Maher are all in the running, as is Jimmy Kimmel, who would get my vote after a stellar year.

Ryan Murphy’s Feud: Bette & Joan (right) was a well-crafted follow-up to last year’s outstanding The People v. O.J. Simpson. Glad to see if get Best Limited Series recognition and a total of 18 nominations, including one each for its two leads, Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon. Judy Davis and Stanley Tucci deserved their Best Supporting nods for the “Baby Jane” biopic, but I was disappointed always dependable Alfred Molina didn’t make the Emmy cut.

Colbert hosts the prime time Emmy special Sept. 17 on CBS.

 

Bill Brioux currently contributes to the Toronto Star, The Canadian Press and blogs at brioux.tv, TV Feeds My Family.

 
 
 
 
 
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Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

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