vudu.com
 
2016
Dec
24
 
 
On this day in 1966, New York television station WPIX introduced its beloved broadcast tradition, 'The Yule Log...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
23
 
 
On this day in 1951, DuMont presented the first coast-to-coast broadcast of a National Football League championship game...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
22
 
 
On this day in 1975, Archie Bunker's "little girl" Gloria gave birth to a son, Joseph Michael Stivic, on CBS's All in the Family...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
21
 
 
On this day in 1983, former president Gerald R. Ford and his wife, Betty Ford, appeared as themselves on an episode of ABC's Dynasty...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
20
 
 
This day in 1979 marked the debut of the Dallas spinoff, Knots Landing...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
19
 
 
On this day in 1987, NBC recognized Johnny Carson's Tonight Show predecessor with the one-hour special, Jack Paar is Alive and Well!...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
18
 
 
On this day in 1966, CBS introduced the animated version of Dr. Seuss' children's story, How the Grinch Stole Christmas!...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
17
 
 
On this day in 1984, CBS presented an adaptation of Charles Dickens' classic Christmas tale, A Christmas Carol, starring George C. Scott as Ebenezer Scrooge...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
16
 
 
This day in 1975 marked the premiere of CBS's One Day at a Time...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
15
 
 
On this day in 1954, ABC's anthology series, Disneyland, aired the first installment of Davy Crockett...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is now avaialble on Amazon.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

This Day in TV History