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2017
Feb
18
 
 
Bob Odenkirk visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert recently to discuss rough clips for a movie idea, Late Show: The Movie in which he stars as Stephen Colbert. Turns out, Colbert also appears in it — in the role of Bob Odenkirk. But the Inception-like reversals don’t stop there...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
8
 
 
David has recapped The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour 50th anniversary for the New York Times this week, and in his TVWW blog. Looking back, it’s no surprise the young brothers got their own show on CBS in 1967. Their timing, charm and wit were quite something... The brothers returned to CBS in 1988 for a memorable reunion special...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
6
 
 
Granted, this may not be for all TVWW readers, but greetings from Boston, home of one of your TVWW editors and a million or so bleary-eyed survivors of last night’s historic Super Bowl LI overtime finish...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Feb
4
 
 

Back in the day, the first Super Bowl wasn’t even the name for the game. It was known in 1967 as the AFL-NFL World Championship Game...  but the instinct for spectacle was there from the start...


 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
25
 
 
The loss of cherished TV favorite Mary Tyler Moore brings a multitude of memories to mind for so many of us...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
24
 
 
It’s for the return of a beloved and acclaimed HBO series, but this particular promo manages to be much more than a plug for an upcoming show. Video Worth Watch seldom presents promos in this spot, but this new, clever HBO ad absolutely deserves the attention, and the praise...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
21
 
 
As Idina Menzel premieres this weekend in the Lifetime remake of the 1988 Bette Midler/Barbara Hershey film, Beaches, we're thinking her most remembered moment wasn’t her run as the original Elphaba in Wicked on Broadway. Or, as part of the Glee cast, or even with her voicing of Queen Elsa in Frozen, singing the smash hit “Let it Go"...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
16
 
 
Here’s President Harry S. Truman’s address, January 20, 1949, from the first presidential inauguration to be televised. Truman, although having run as an incumbent after the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt, trailed his opponent in many polls of the day, similar to the data stream of 2016...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jan
2
 
 
After last year’s wild ride, we’re kicking off 2017 with a five-minute meditation; a bit of reality programming from a middle-of-the-night chauffeured view from the dashboard cam of driver Noah Forman — who made 236 green lights (and one yellow) in New York City in 26 minutes...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Dec
19
 
 
2016 has been volatile, to say the least, and seemed about 863 days long...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for under $20.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post