DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

GERALD JORDAN

CANDACE KELLEY

TOM BRINKMOELLER

MONIQUE NAZARETH

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
SecondSpin.com
 
2008
May
30
 
 
All I can say is, "Wow." The fourth-season finale of ABC's "Lost" not only was every bit as dramatic, revealing and surprising as I'd hoped -- it was the year's Exhibit A for Reasons Not to Give Up on Network Television. I only hope network executives across the board were watching, and learning their lesson...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
28
 
 
My next column for "Broadcasting & Cable" magazine, to be published Monday, is all about what I call "made-from-TV movies," pegged to this weekend's release of the big-screen "Sex and the City" film and, three weeks later, the "Get Smart" remake...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
27
 
 
Over Memorial Day weekend, New York's Fordham University and West London's Brunel University banded together in New York to present a memorial to "The Sopranos." The invigorating international conference, called "The Sopranos: A Wake," gathered academics from as far away as Australia to dissect and debate the groundbreaking HBO series. The participants presented papers, offered observations, and, in at least one case, generated controversy...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
23
 
 
Since HBO is repeating yesterday's "Recount" telemovie tonight at 9 p.m. ET, I decided to give myself a holiday and repeat yesterday's blog as well -- and run my review of "Recount" all over again. Which makes it, I guess, a re-Recount...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
22
 
 
I've never met Frank Rich, never even talked to him. Yet yesterday's announcement that he has signed on as a creative consultant for HBO, to initiate and help develop projects, sounds like the best move HBO has made since green-lighting "Deadwood." And Rich, because of his decades of experience as both an Op-Ed columnist and drama critic for The New York Times, should be anything but dead wood...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
21
 
 
As I write this Wednesday morning, the victor in this year's "American Idol" is unknown. Depending upon when you read this, the outcome may be a sure thing. But here's one sure thing regardless: TV's about to get duller, again, for a few months. After tonight, the May ratings sweeps, and the 2007-08 TV season, are over...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
20
 
 
Since November 5, when TV Worth Watching was launched, I've written every word of every review, blog, best bet and feature that's appeared on this website. Beginning today, I'm happy to report, that's no longer the case. Did I say "happy"? I meant "ecstatic"...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
19
 
 
Publishers Weekly broke the news last week in its "Deals" column, so it's official: My book on the controversial 1960s CBS Smothers Brothers variety show is scheduled to be published as a Touchstone hardcover in October 2009. Now all I have to do is write it...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
15
 
 
Although it's in first place in the ratings, the Fox network was in last place at the upfronts -- but was worth the wait. It offered advance tastes of what look to be the two best new shows of the season, Joss Whedon's "Dollhouse" and J,.J. Abrams' "Fringe" -- and then announced a brilliant new way of showcasing them...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2008
May
14
 
 
Partway through the CBS upfront presentation at Carnegie Hall, Entertainment President Nina Tassler promoted one of her network's new summer entries, a reality series called "The Greatest American Dog," by having an actual dog run across the stage and greet her, then wait for its cue to exit, stage left...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post