DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
Save 50% off on 26 weeks of The New York Times Digital
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
"Until we say hello on our next show, it's time to say goodbye again," Betty White sang at the close of her short-lived ABC variety show, The Betty White Show, which was last televised today in 1958. The show - which you can see here - ran in the spot formerly held by her canceled sitcom, Date with the Angels, and consisted of Betty and her co-stars performing a variety of skits.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
One of the most hard-won achievements in life is knowing who we really are. For three young people in the new documentary American Transgender, discovering their true selves was just the beginning...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
In this new episode, the characters, even more so than usual, engage in bad behavior that may have long-term consequences – especially the behavior that takes place in a casino. And speaking of long-term, is tonight’s rambling, gambling episode likely to shed actual light on the identity of Ted’s eventual spouse? Don’t bet on it.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
Last week, though the staging of the production numbers was a bit much, the most talented performers progressed to this week’s round. Which is all you can hope for – other than for judge Adam Levine to get to the point a little more quickly.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
This 1997 James L. Brooks movie is a showcase of excellent writing, acting and directing – all of which were duly honored at the Oscars and elsewhere. Helen Hunt plays a diner waitress who both clashes and connects with a difficult regular patron, who has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. He’s played by Jack Nicholson, in a challenging yet successful, and delightful, performance.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
Next month, House will wrap up its series, so almost anything can happen in these final four episodes. But tonight, as Robert Sean Leonard’s Wilson goes home with House to be administered a high-risk, against-the-odds cancer treatment, is Wilson actually at risk of dying, and leaving the show a month early? Possible. But not probable. Wilson and House, as at the end of Casablanca, deserve one closing scene together in the finale to underscore their complicated, enduring, entertaining
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
Uma Thurman, as Hollywood actress Rebecca Duvall, continues her guest run on this TV series – and, within this series, as the star of Bombshell. Tonight, in a new episode called Tech,” the Marilyn Monroe musical heads to Boston for out-of-town tryouts. To try out our Everybody’s a Critic guest column by theatrical lighting designer Benjamin Ehrenreich, who writes about what does and doesn’t ring true from his perspective, click HERE.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
Jesse Owens was a flawed hero whose record-setting exploits in track took him to the 1936 Olympics, yet still did not shield him from racism. On Tuesday, PBS's American Experience tells his story...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
It’s been two months since executive producer Frank Valentini and head writer Ron Carlivati took control of ABC’s ailing General Hospital. TVWW's Ed Martin assesses their progress, and makes a few creative suggestions of his own...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Apr
30
 
 
Last year, Craig Ferguson and his cronies went to France for a week of freewheeling, genre-bending talk shows. The week of May 14, he does it again, this time in Scotland. He checks in on his home town of Cumbernauld, and presents some serious interviews, as well as lots of comic nonsense, along the way...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 
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