DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
What a delightful film – and what a pleasant way to begin the New Year, by laughing out loud. This 1963 movie, in which Peter Sellers introduces the bumbling character of Inspector Clouseau, is a very, very funny film. David Niven, Robert Wagner and Capucine co-star, but this movie belongs completely to one actor. It’s a Sellers market.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
This 2011 movie focuses on the making of another movie – specifically, a week of filming during 1957’s The Prince and the Showgirl, which starred Laurence Olivier and Marilyn Monroe. The point of view here is from Olivier’s assistant, Colin Clark, who documents the stars’ flinty relationship, and his own “dream week” with the vulnerable, magnetic actress. Eddie Redmayne portrays Clark, Olivier is played by Kenneth Branagh, and Monroe is played by Michelle Will
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
Michael Kantor, who looked lovingly and intelligently at New York stage history in Broadway: The American Musical, returns with another smart, talent-filled treatise, this time focusing on Jewish performers, composers, book writers and influences on the Broadway musical. Joel Grey hosts, and the vintage performance clips you’ll see include Zero Mostel in Fiddler on the Roof, Nathan Lane in The Producers, Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl, and, yes, David Hyde-Pierce in Spamalot, singing the p
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
Of all the series on my Top 10 TV Shows of 2012 list, this is the first to return in 2013 with a fresh episode. I’m still recovering from the Christmas episode, so I hope this one takes it a little easier, emotionally. For that matter, I hope 2013 does, too. I’m just saying…
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
This 1950 movie, directed by John Huston, is fun to watch because it's such a prototypical film noir, and because its plot - of a daring robbery and what happens afterward - has been borrowed by so many other subsequent films, including Reservoir Dogs. But watch, too, for the actress who stars, playing Doll Conovan, opposite Sterling Hayden.  She's Jean Hagen, who's much more familiar from comedy roles - especially as Danny Thomas' wife in Make Room for Daddy, and as Lina Lamont, the silent
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
On this day in 1976, NBC marked its fiftieth year of broadcasting with the introduction of a new network logo...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
As one of its last acts of 2012, PBS presented a Live from Lincoln Center tribute to Marvin Hamlisch — a concert that timidly took the coward’s way out, and doesn’t bode well for 2013…
 
 
 
  
 
 
2013
Jan
1
 
 
HBO Video has replaced its lavish gift box with this slimmer set...but all five seasons are here, of a series that captivates, challenges and entertains from beginning to end – especially the end. What a series finale...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Dec
31
 
 
This day in 1972, marked the last telecast of the CBS sitcom, Anna and the King...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2012
Dec
31
 
 
This should have been a TVWW Christmas present, but let's call it a parting gift for 2012. This short, from the ESPN documentary series E:60, features Team Ghost Riders, the Cowboy Monkey Rodeo...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post