DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
Save 50% off on 26 weeks of The New York Times Digital
 
2010
Mar
31
 
 
The University of Georgia's Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication just revealed the winners of its Peabody Awards for the best electronic media efforts in 2009 -- and, as usual, the Peabody panel has demonstrated a jaw-dropping combination of taste, breadth and depth. Glee made the cut...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
30
 
 
America's been adapting British series for decades. All in the Family came from Til Death Do Us Part. Three's Company was originally Man About the House. NBC's The Office owes its existence to Ricky Gervais' BBC The Office. Dramas like Life on Mars, Cracker, Eleventh Hour and Queer as Folk started in England, too. Now it's going the other way...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
25
 
 
There's something about Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution, the new ABC reality series launching Friday night at 8 ET, that comes as a total surprise. For a program about the dangers and proliferation of disgusting processed foods, it's shockingly easy to swallow. In fact, this has the makings of one tasty reality show...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
24
 
 
Robert Culp might well be the poster boy for not knowing what we've got till it's gone. His blend of relaxed amiability, authority, smarts and relaxed wit have rarely been matched on TV...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
24
 
 
The god of special effects blesses us Friday night. Ray Harryhausen inspired generations of movie makers with his stop-motion mastery from the 1950s to the 1980s...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
23
 
 
[Bianculli here: Last year, I attended a conference at St. Vincent College's Fred Rogers Center, and reported on it for TV WORTH WATCHING, where plans were made to carry on the vision and children's TV commitment of Fred Rogers. Yesterday, when worthy recipients were given scholarships to pursue their modern visions of children's entertainment and education, I was at Rowan University teaching -- but contributing writer Tom Brinkmoeller pursued the results on his own, and has this encouraging news flash...]
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
22
 
 
On Showtime tonight, two engrossing TV characters return who are struggling to keep themselves together: Edie Falco as the pill-popping "Nurse Jackie", and Toni Collette as the woman with several distinct personalities in "The United States of Tara". Both shows are wonderful -- and if both Collette and Falco aren't competing this fall for Best Actress Emmys, something's awfully wrong somewhere...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
22
 
 
Mad music, mad design, mad remake -- this is one mad week on TV DVD...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
19
 
 
The opening, pre-credits sequence of Sunday's third-season premiere of AMC's "Breaking Bad" is a wordless marvel. It begins with a shot of a beautiful landscape, then pans down to reveal one man crawling. Then another, then many more, like human ants following some invisible, humbling trail. Where? Why?...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Mar
18
 
 
Discovery Channel's previous major co-production with the BBC, 2006's Planet Earth, was a fabulous nature miniseries, presenting astounding visuals and intelligent, illuminating narration in every installment. The networks' newest collaboration, a 10-part series called Life, is just as satisfying... but only in the visual sense...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 
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