DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
 
2010
Oct
28
 
 
Television viewers will remember 2010 as the year that began with the arrival of the most brutal and graphic series in the history of the medium -- Starz' gory gladiator epic Spartacus -- and ended with the premiere of another show that is in many ways even more violent and shocking -- AMC's The Walking Dead. Tellingly, both programs could have been slapdash cheese fests, in the rich traditions of the low-budget sword-and-sandal movies and goofy zombie flicks that filled drive-ins (and late-n
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
28
 
 
It's pretty safe to assume that wherever a voter in the upcoming election falls on the Red-to-Blue political spectrum, that person may be a little wary of the efficacy of America's voting system. A story on Friday's "Need to Know" on PBS might give that suspicion bug additional shelf life...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
26
 
 
If you watched Bravo during its early days, you found foreign and independent films, jazz, ballet and stage productions. Who could have guessed when it was created by Cablevision in 1980 as ''the first television service dedicated to film and the performing arts'' that Bravo would become the creative cauldron of reality TV?...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
26
 
 
"Project Runway's" dapper mentor Tim Gunn is one of my heroes. Not only is he whip smart, he usually conforms to a high standard of propriety -- a true gentleman as well as a gentle man. Some might argue that Gunn steps out of character when he feels compelled to be a truth teller -- not me. It is just another facet of him that I admire...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
25
 
 
UPDATE: If you missed TCM's Oct. 26 lineup, they'll have another baseball slate next Tuesday, Nov. 2. This one adds 1988's Eight Men Out and 1942's It Happened in Flatbush, while encoring Ronald Reagan in The Winning Team, William Bendix in The Babe Ruth Story, and both Joe E. Brown comedies...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
25
 
 
The tube speeds toward Halloween with ever more movie terror, plus series scares (and silliness). There's everything from Lon Chaney's silent chillers to the trashy trick-or-treat of Roseanne. Fright films are running nonstop through Sunday's holiday on AMC...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
24
 
 
The internet was rife last week with postmortems on the season finales of AMC's Mad Men and Rubicon. And with good reason: These two shows gave us the most to discuss simply because they were better -- and smarter -- than everything else TV had to offer...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
23
 
 
Halloween hauntings just keep happening. And for both classic eminence and downright perversity, it's hard to beat Nosferatu (late Sunday at midnight ET, Turner Classic Movies), the original vampire movie that influenced all others...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
22
 
 
If more television commercials had been made by the people profiled on Tuesday's "Independent Lens," there would have been no need to invent the mute button. "Art & Copy" premieres Tuesday, Oct. 26 on PBS, and it offers a satisfying look at what could be called advertising's hall-of-famers -- the people who create commercials we don't want to ignore...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2010
Oct
18
 
 
Now that TV is everywhere, so is this website. While Bianculli clues you in on what to watch, other TVWW writers go behind the scenes to explore how it got made, or gets promoted, or lives on beyond its airing...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post