DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
 
2016
Jan
1
 
 
This one’s been idling for a while after being announced long before Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump injected his views on illegal immigration and how he’d stop it...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Jan
1
 
 
The “every episode in sequence” mega-marathon of Rod Serling’s iconic The Twilight Zone continues, all day and all night. Part of the fun, in this case, comes from catching the less familiar episodes, and watching, even after all this time, a Zone that, though not new, is new to you. But there also are the joys of revisiting the classic standbys, which, today, would include “To Serve Man” at 5 p.m. ET and “The Dummy,” starring Cliff Robertson (pictured)
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Jan
1
 
 
With Syfy showing a marathon of Rod Serling’s TV anthology show The Twilight Zone to start the New Year, BBC America, or some other network, could have done the same with Alfred Hitchcock, by replaying his anthology series, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, as a start-the-year marathon. Some network should do that, next year. But for this year, BBC America is presenting four of Hitchcock’s best-known, and best-made, films, all day, in a loop of truly memorable movies. You can dive in any ti
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Jan
1
 
 
Many people want to start the New Year fresh. In prime time, TCM is starting it off with a remake: a 1960 version of Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai, remade as an American Western starring tough gunmen, instead of tough swordsmen, defending helpless villagers. Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen star.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Jan
1
 
 
Have you missed Sherlock, the modern incarnation with Martin Freeman as Watson and Benedict Cumberbatch? So have I – but when you return for tonight’s 90-minute special, don’t be thrown if Sherlock doesn’t have a cell phone. For this one-time experiment, at least for now, a Sherlock adventure is being staged as originally written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, rather than modernized. That means tonight’s “The Abominable Bride” is set in 1880s London, with th
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Jan
1
 
 
The 1950 Disney classic is repeated in prime time – a nice way to start the New Year, especially with young family members around.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2015
Dec
31
 
 

The U.S. Postal Service waited until the end of 2015 to announce its stamp roster for 2016, but one set of stamps deserves immediate special attention on TVWW. It’s a stylishly designed quartet of stamps devoted to the golden anniversary of Star Trek…

 
 
 
  
 
 
2015
Dec
31
 
 
But by the time the most popular series in PBS history wraps up this March, empowered women could be one of its strongest legacies...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2015
Dec
31
 
 
Whenever you read this, tune to Syfy, and you’ll see an episode of Rod Serling’s classic series The Twilight Zone – then another, then another, all presented in chronological order. Imagine, if you will, a New Year’s tradition that, this year, offers up the entire series, in order. rather than random episodes presented out of sequence.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2015
Dec
31
 
 
All day until 8 p.m. ET, tune to TCM, and you’ll see a Marx Brothers movie. What better way to end a year? Their classic A Night at the Opera, from 1935, is at noon ET, and my favorite, their 1933 Duck Soup (pictured), is presented at 6:45 p.m. ET. But whenever you tune in, you’ll laugh. That’s a TVWW promise…
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post