DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

CANDACE KELLEY

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
Save 50% off on 26 weeks of The New York Times Digital
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 

Grant Tinker, the TV executive arguably most responsible for the evolution of quality TV, died Monday at age 90. His legacy lives on, but even though I haven’t spoken to him in years, I really, really miss him already…

 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
Grant Tinker, the self-deprecating visionary who founded a legendary TV studio and resurrected a comatose network has died at age 90 in his home. Lamentably a bygone relic to most younger viewers, his death wasn’t even made public until two days after the fact...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
I didn’t house the work I have done for TV Worth Watching under the “Raised on MTM” roof without reason. So much of what I consider valuable about television has its roots in Grant Tinker...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
The late Grant Tinker is being remembered today as a man who brought out the best in television, and his legacy supports that almost mystical accolade. It’s worth adding, however, that Tinker also lived in the real TV world, where your whole menu can’t be shiitake mushroom soufflés. Sometimes you also need burgers and fries or you won’t stay in business. When Tinker died Monday at the age of 90, the gems of his career deserved everything that’s being said about
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
With Grant Tinker’s passing, there are many milestone moments in the MTM archive that helped transform television into what it is today... One of our favorite MTM moments was from the 1975 Mary Tyler Moore Show episode, “Chuckles Bites the Dust." Mary, stricken by grief at the news of Chuckles the Clown's death, had been scolding the WJM staff for making repeated clown jokes about the tragedy. Except that all, memorably, changes at Chuckles’ funeral...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
Our imminent real-life futures may be problematic enough after a certain power shift takes hold early next year. But time will tell...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
It’s one for the money, two for the show, and tree to get ready. Tonight’s the lighting of the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, an annual ceremony that only in the past decade or so has been deemed worthy of being televised. But here it is, with not only the visuals of the lights, but the sounds of the holidays – as delivered in song by Tony Bennett, Josh Groban, Dolly Parton, Garth Brooks, and others.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
The CW superhero parade of DC Comics characters continues tonight, as Arrow – a.k.a. Green Arrow, at least in the vintage comics – hosts the latest hour in this week’s four-episode, four-series crossover story. And if the prospect of that make you all a-quiver – well, Arrow is the place for quivers, so why not?
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
This new NBC holiday telemovie is a sequel to last year’s Coat of Many Colors Dolly Parton holiday biography. If anything, the sentimental quotient is upped for this continuation movie, which once again stars Alyvia Alyn Lind as the young Dolly Parton – and the current Dolly Parton as a vision of herself billed as the Painted Lady.
 
 
 
  
 
 
2016
Nov
30
 
 
There are only two episodes left in this season’s new shows, and its continuing story line of an international computer hack aimed at trolls in general – and, in tonight’s episode, at South Park residents in particular.
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 
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